Tight Hip Flexors?

This week Carrie Glenn, CrossFit Hyannis’ in house PT, addresses how to identify if you have tight hip flexors and some simple exercises to do to address it!

Does your back hurt while you’re standing? Do the front of your hips feel sore or uncomfortable when walking or squatting?

– Tight hip flexors could be the cause. Your hip flexors (iliopsoas) originates from your thoracic and lumbar spine and insert to your femur. These muscles activate to bend your hips and initiate the swing phase of gait. These muscles become shortened while sitting, causing tightness in many people.

FullSizeRender-Test your hip flexor and quad tightness. Lay flat on your back with you spine flattened against the bed and legs hanging off the end. To test your left leg, pull your right knee to your chest

– If your left thigh lifts up off the bed, you have restriction in your left hip flexors and/or anterior hip capsule
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– If your left knee straightens, you have restriction of the left rectus femoris which is part of your quadriceps that cross both the knee and the hip

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-If your left hip stays down and your left knee stays bent, your test is negative, which indicates good mobility of the iliopsoas and rectus femoris FullSizeRender 3

*If your self test was positive for tightness here are some ways to stretch your hip flexors

-hip flexor and quad stretch against wall
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-half kneel hip flexor stretch
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-supine hip flexor stretch
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-backwards walking on treadmill at low speed (1.0-1.5 mph) with focus on long steps backwards

During stretches, make sure to keep your lower back straight with a pelvic tilt. Stretches should feel strong but not painful and should be held for a minimum of 30 seconds.

If you’re interested in setting up a one-on-one session to help with either a chronic issue or a little flare up, contact her at 845-430-0720 to set up an appointment. As a CrossFitter, Carrie understands what we do and is an expert at helping rehab injuries, correct imbalances, using manual therapy and active release to help improve movement and mobility.

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